Al Brydon

#1 (2018)

10" x 7.5"

#7 (2018)

10" x 7.5"

#8 (2018)

10" x 7.5"

#29 (2018)

30" x 21"

#32 (2018)

30" x 21"

#35 (2018)

30" x 21"

#46 (2018)

10" x 7.5"

#49 (2018)

30" x 21"

#57 (2018)

30" x 21"

#61 (2018)

30" x 21"

#72 (2018)

30" x 21"

#73 (2018)

30" x 21"

Signed limited edition giclee prints on Hahnemuhle photo rag paper

30″ x 21″ – Edition of 25 – £750
10″ x 7.5″ – Edition of 40 – £195

 

To enquire email

jennie.anderson@argenteagallery.com

anna.sparham@argenteagallery.com

or call   +44 (0)121 236 5444

 

 

Solargraphs are pinhole cameras with exposure times measured in months rather than fractions of a second. This slowing down of time produces the arcs of the sun as it traces its way across the sky. The ‘how’ isn’t anywhere near as important as the ‘why’ but it gives an idea of what’s involved in making the work. The length of time involved raises certain questions. As Al Brydon suggests, “Is it a different me collecting the solargraph than the person who left it? Maybe a window into what the landscape looks like when
I’m not there to experience it?”

“What’s implied in the image is as important as what you can see. Anything moving quickly isn’t pictured but is in there. Solargraphs see everything (metaphorically) like photographic black holes. Every moment of joy and sadness you have experienced while each exposure was made is in there somewhere. A newborn’s first breath and another’s last. The chaos of the
universe condensed into photographic form. More than a moment, a tumbling cascade of moments set within the confines of a 5×7 piece of darkroom paper. With Solargraphs we are able to experience time almost in a geological sense and gain a glimpse into a differing reality than our own; a looped reminder of how wonderfully fleeting our lives are.” Al Brydon

 

Al Brydon is a photographer based in the north of the UK working on long term landscape photography projects. His work has been published and exhibited both in the UK and internationally. Brydon is also a Co-founder of the Inside the Outside collective. Using photography as a vehicle for storytelling, he is interested in the history of the landscape and human interaction and alteration of it.