Melanie King

Ancient Light, Tree Canopy Grizedale Forest (2018)

29.5 x 29.5 cm (framed); 18.5 x 18.5 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Ancient Light, Evergreen Tree, Grizedale Forest (2017)

29.5 x 29.5 cm (framed); 18.5 x 18.5 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Ancient Light, Meteor Grizedale Forest (2017)

29.5 x 29.5 cm (framed); 17 x 17 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Ancient Light, Jupiter Atina, Italy (2018)

31.5 x 29.5 cm (framed); 20.5 x 18 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Perseid Meteor Shower Atina, Italy (2018)

33 x 29.5 cm (framed); 20.5 x 17 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Ancient Light Snowdrift I, Iceland (2018)

16.5 x 32.5 cm (framed); 13.5 x 20 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Ancient Light Snowdrift II, Iceland (2018)

16.5 x 32.5 cm (framed); 13.5 x 20 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Ancient Light, Star Trails Grizedale Forest (2018)

29.5 x 29.5 cm (framed); 18.5 x 18.5 cm (image size)

Framed, Silver Gelatin Print

£375

Framed silver gelatin prints at £375

To enquire email

jennie.anderson@argenteagallery.com

or call   +44 (0)121 236 5444

Ancient Light is an ongoing series for King capturing the night sky through analogue black and white film. During residencies at Grizedale Forest (UK), Joya AIR (Spain), Atina (Italy) and the UCLO Observatory, London, King ventured outside in the darkness to make these photographs, embracing and capturing the starlit landscapes through long exposures.

“I am interested in capturing light that has travelled for thousands, if not millions, of years before reaching the photosensitive film.  In some cases, light has been travelling from the stars for longer than the existence of conscious life on Earth.”

These long exposures of the stars allow us to see streaks of ancient light in the sky as the Earth turns on its axis.

Melanie King is a visual artist and practice-based researcher at the Royal College of Art.

Inspired by the common histories of photography and science, she is interested in the relationship between astronomy, photography and materiality, in particular the innate connection between the photograph as object and the Earth itself. Her research considers how the silver used in photosensitive film is extracted from the Earth and how its atoms were forged in the furnace of a supernovae.

King has exhibited in a wide range of international galleries, such as The Photographers’ Gallery, UK, the Hasselblad Foundation, Sweden, BOZAR Brussels, Unseen Amsterdam, the Williamson Gallery in Los Angeles and CAS Gallery in Japan.

Melanie regularly presents her work at conferences, universities and galleries. Notable venues include the Victoria and Albert Museum, The Photographers’ Gallery, Tate Modern, Science Museum, Art Center Pasadena (USA), University of the Arts Helsinki, The European Geosciences Conference: Vienna, The National Maritime Museum,  Kosmica: Mexico, Kosmica: Paris, Helsinki Photomedia and Second Home.